Enroll in Physical and Life Sciences

Be Challenged. Be Inspired. Be Encouraged.

Course 202 – Physical and Life Sciences: Foundation Blocks of Humanism
with Faculty Dale Bryant
Friday, April 20 – Sunday, 22, 2018
(9am to 5pm each day)
American Humanist Association Office
1821 Jefferson Pl, NW, Washington, DC 20036
Cost includes daily breakfast and lunch

Understand the various attacks on, problems for, and factors influencing the pursuit of science, which is a foundation block of humanism. Scientific work is done in a cultural setting, which is influenced by the politics and economic factors of the day. In the past we have had to worry about the “creationists.” While the creationists are still present and doing damage, there are new challenges in the postmodern world. Truth claims come from various ethnic groups with alternative stories. All are looking for validation. Challenges come from feminism, multiculturalism and religious conservatives. This course explores these issues to better understand what science is, what it does, and what it tells us.

Only students who have completed prerequisite Course 101 (The Humanist Lifestance) may enroll in Course 202. Minimum of 5 enrolled students is required to offer any course. Please email us if interested in Course 101.

Enroll in Physical and Life Sciences

Faculty

Dale Bryant is the Technology Director at Wunderman, a global digital advertising agency. He holds a MLIS from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a MS in American history from Minnesota State University, Mankato. Despite growing up in a very rural and religious part of South Dakota and spending four years at an Evangelical boarding school, Dale managed to leave his superstitions behind. Today he has a passion for history, skepticism, and science education.

On-Site Training for Celebrants: Las Vegas

Join on-site training for individuals who are currently Humanist Celebrants or desiring to become Humanist Celebrants.

Sunday, May 20, 2018, 10am-4pm

Flamingo Las Vegas Hotel and Casino
3555 S Las Vegas Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89109
(after American Humanist Association Conference)

  • Learn how to prepare unique & inspiring humanist wedding ceremonies
  • Find out how to care for individuals nearing the end of life & support their families
  • Gain understanding of how humanists celebrate life events & milestones
  • Understand how to give proper local meeting invocations

Note: The AHA Center for Education trains celebrants and The Humanist Society endorses celebrants, enabling them to perform ceremonies. This training will inform you how to get endorsed but will not endorse you.

Register Here

A full refund will be provided if cancellation notice is given 15 days in advance of the training. No refunds will be made thereafter.

10:00-10:30amWelcome & Introductions
10:30-12:00pmWeddings
12:00-1:00pmLunch (Provided)
1:00-2:30pmEnd of Life Preparation & Memorials
2:30-3:00pmInvocations
3:00-3:30pmBaby Welcomings
3:30-4:00pmComing of Age Celebrations

*Participants will receive supporting materials to begin (or add to) their personal library of resources i.e. sample ceremonies, suggested readings, creative ideas. Endorsed celebrants will be added to a local database.

Trainers

Kathy Diedrich holds credentials as a Humanist Celebrant and a Certified Life Cycle Celebrant. She earned certificates from the Celebrant Foundation and Institute in Foundations of Celebrancy, Weddings, Funerals, and Ceremonies for Children and Families. Since 2010, she has performed over 250 ceremonies, writing each one to meet the needs and wishes of her clients. Kathy has offered weddings, memorials, naming ceremonies, and coming of age ceremonies. While the demand for secular services came as somewhat of a surprise, Kathy is happy to provide custom, meaningful ceremonies throughout southeastern Minnesota, and to often be the first face of Humanism for her clients. Before becoming a full-time celebrant, Kathy was a programmer and project manager at IBM for 28 years.

kristinKristin Wintermuteis the Director of Education for the American Humanist Association. She has BA degrees in Psychology and Art Studio from the University of Montana and a Master’s degree in Social Work from the University of Maine, Orono. Wintermute has done post-graduate course work in Business Administration at the University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Management; Web Design at Minneapolis College of Art and Design; and Accounting Certification at North Hennepin Community College. She worked for over seven years as a family therapist in a variety of settings, including private practice, a non-profit clinic for women and a for-profit health maintenance organization.

She is a life-long humanist who attended the First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis (FUS) throughout her childhood and teen years. At first she was enrolled in FUS’s “Humanist Education Program” and in high school became a classroom teacher. As an undergraduate at the University of Montana, she used FUS’s “Humanist Education Program” curriculum at the Unitarian Fellowship of Missoula, Montana to form their first Humanist-oriented Sunday School. In 1998, she was hired by the North American Committee for Humanism (NACH) as Membership Director. In 1999, NACH and its subsidiary, The Humanist Institute, became one organization and she became its business manager and now is the executive director.

On-Site Training for Celebrants: Colorado

Join on-site training for individuals who are currently Humanist Celebrants or desiring to become Humanist Celebrants.

Saturday, April 21, 2018, 10am-4pm

La Baguette
2417 W Colorado Ave, Colorado Springs, CO 80904
$75 per person

  • Learn how to prepare unique & inspiring humanist wedding ceremonies
  • Find out how to care for individuals nearing the end of life & support their families
  • Gain understanding of how humanists celebrate life events & milestones
  • Understand how to give proper local meeting invocations

Note: The AHA Center for Education trains celebrants and The Humanist Society endorses celebrants, enabling them to perform ceremonies. This training will inform you how to get endorsed but will not endorse you.

Register Here

A full refund will be provided if cancellation notice is given 15 days in advance of the training. No refunds will be made thereafter.

10:00-10:30amWelcome & Introductions
10:30-12:00pmWeddings
12:00-1:00pmLunch (Provided)
1:00-2:30pmEnd of Life Preparation & Memorials
2:30-3:00pmInvocations
3:00-3:30pmBaby Welcomings
3:30-4:00pmComing of Age Celebrations

*Participants will receive supporting materials to begin (or add to) their personal library of resources i.e. sample ceremonies, suggested readings, creative ideas. Endorsed celebrants will be added to a local database.

Trainers

Kathy Diedrich holds credentials as a Humanist Celebrant and a Certified Life Cycle Celebrant. She earned certificates from the Celebrant Foundation and Institute in Foundations of Celebrancy, Weddings, Funerals, and Ceremonies for Children and Families. Since 2010, she has performed over 250 ceremonies, writing each one to meet the needs and wishes of her clients. Kathy has offered weddings, memorials, naming ceremonies, and coming of age ceremonies. While the demand for secular services came as somewhat of a surprise, Kathy is happy to provide custom, meaningful ceremonies throughout southeastern Minnesota, and to often be the first face of Humanism for her clients. Before becoming a full-time celebrant, Kathy was a programmer and project manager at IBM for 28 years.

kristinKristin Wintermuteis the Director of Education for the American Humanist Association. She has BA degrees in Psychology and Art Studio from the University of Montana and a Master’s degree in Social Work from the University of Maine, Orono. Wintermute has done post-graduate course work in Business Administration at the University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Management; Web Design at Minneapolis College of Art and Design; and Accounting Certification at North Hennepin Community College. She worked for over seven years as a family therapist in a variety of settings, including private practice, a non-profit clinic for women and a for-profit health maintenance organization.

She is a life-long humanist who attended the First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis (FUS) throughout her childhood and teen years. At first she was enrolled in FUS’s “Humanist Education Program” and in high school became a classroom teacher. As an undergraduate at the University of Montana, she used FUS’s “Humanist Education Program” curriculum at the Unitarian Fellowship of Missoula, Montana to form their first Humanist-oriented Sunday School. In 1998, she was hired by the North American Committee for Humanism (NACH) as Membership Director. In 1999, NACH and its subsidiary, The Humanist Institute, became one organization and she became its business manager and now is the executive director.

Lodging Nearby

Garden of the Gods
Clarion Hotel & Conference Center
The Old Town
Airbnb

Discovering Nature

How to Make a Sketchbook

education.com

Spring and Summer seasons always invite fun-filled outdoor play and exploration.  Enhance your young child’s experience with nature by creating garden journal sketchbooks.  This project is an activity that allows children to combine artistic techniques, visual aesthetic explorations, and literacy skills while being introduced to basic nature concepts.

The initial lesson focuses on the construction and decoration of the journal/sketchbook.  Using printing methods, children will create individual garden themed covers.  Then your child will get a chance to develop her fine motor skills by “sewing” the books together.  The finished product will allow for extension and continuation into outdoor sketching activities and letter writing development.  This is a great project to do with your child during those warm Spring and Summer months to get her outdoors and keep her mind active!

What you need:

  • Construction paper (enough for a cover, back, and at least three interior pages)
  • Pipe cleaners (cut in half)
  • Tempera paint
  • Natural materials (i.e. leaves, flowers, twigs, acorns)
  • Markers or crayons
  • Hole punch

What you do:

  1. Punch holes in the construction paper.  One near the top and one near the bottom making sure both holes are close to the same edge of the piece of paper.  Align all the holes for each journal/sketchbook together; these will be used when sewing the book together.
  2. If possible, take a field trip outdoors to gather natural materials with your child.  Ask the children to choose a few different items from the materials found to use in the printmaking process.
  3. Your child can dip each material into the tempera paint, then press onto the construction paper cover.  This time can also be used to introduce the concept of multiples (each child should make more than one print from each object).
  4. Label with your child’s name, and set aside to dry.
  5. After the print cover has dried, invite your child to sew her book together using the pipe cleaners.  She can do this by threading the pipe cleaners through the aligned holes, then twisting together.
  6. Go outside!  Venture into nature and bring along the journal/sketchbooks and markers or crayons.  Allow the children to draw what they see.  Encourage your child to label her drawings with words (if they re too young to do this an adult can help).

Keep the journal/sketchbook for an extended period of time and add to it.  Your child can add to it over the course of several different seasons if she likes.  The pipe cleaners can be undone to add extra pieces of paper.  Have your child continually add to the sketchbook as time goes by.  When she’s done, she’ll have created a memorable work of art that will last for many seasons to come!

Discovering Nature

Green Thumb

PBS Parents

Grow beans from the ground up

Materials

  • beans (pole, lima, or snap beans are easy to grow)
  • fork
  • marker
  • masking tape
  • paper cups
  • potting soil
  • shallow tray

Directions

grow and care for plants with your children.

  1. Prepare:  Soak the beans overnight so they will grow faster.  Poke holes in the bottom of the cups with a fork.
  2. Plant:  Talk with your children about plants, explaining that they need water and light to live.
  3. Nuture:  Show children how to water their beans, and discuss how the plants change as they grow.

Discovering Nature

Animal Habitats

PBS Parents

Learn about animals and where they live

Materials

  • art supplies
  • child-safe scissors
  • drawing paper
  • glue
  • paper (large sheet)

Directions

Invite your children to learn more about animals (maybe even about aardvarks like Arthur!).

  1. Prep:  On a very large sheet of paper, draw a map showing trails that wind through forests, fields, deserts, ponds, and oceans.
  2. Discuss:  Display the map on a tabletop or floor.  Ask your children to name some animals and insects that live in the different environments.
  3. Illustrate:  Distribute drawing materials so each child can draw an animal.
  4. Populate:  As you cut out the animals, engage your children in a conversation that will help them share and build knowledge.  Ask:  Where do rabbits live?  What do squirrels like to do?  If you see a baby mouse on the ground, should you pick it up?  Have children glue their animals to the appropriate habitats on the map.  Label each cut-out with the name or first initial of the animal.

Take It Further:  Plan a trip to a nature site or city park.  Have a picnic, sit quietly, listen and look for animals.  Your children can count the ones they see.

Discovering Nature

Walk Like Animals

PBS Parents

Imitate animal movement

Materials

  • art supplies
  • marker
  • music
  • paper (large piece)

Directions

Children love animals, so they’re sure to enjoy this fun movement activity.

  1. Brainstorm:  How many different pets can your children name?  Write the animal names across the top of a large piece of paper.  Put the paper on the floor and invite your children to draw pictures of the animals.
  2. Move:  Have children imitate the motions of each pet on your list.  Say: Let’s take fast little steps like a hamster.  Let’s waddle like a duck.  Music adds to the fun!

Talk About It:  Using your brainstorm list, lead a discussion about the care of common pets.  For instance, ask: How do you take care of a cat?  How do you keep it healthy and happy?

Take It Further:  Provide construction paper and markers for kids to create posters of pets they have or would like to have.  Ask each child to dictate the name of the pet or additional information (e.g., color, size) for you to write on his or her poster.

With a Group (if applicable):  Play a guessing game in which one player acts like a certain pet, and the rest of the group has to guess what animal the player is imitating.

Discovering Nature

Day Two

Step 1:  Read a picture book about spring aloud.

Step 2:  Use the Venn diagram on the chart paper to compare and contrast fall and spring.

Step 3:  Have the children go to their seats and cut out pictures from the magazines that correlate with spring.  Then repeat the rest of the steps from Day 1, this time with spring and the “spring” letters.

Day Three

Step 1:  Sing this poem to the tune of “She’ll Be Comin’ ‘Round the Mountain”:

Oh the leaves turn red and yellow in the fall.
Oh the leaves turn red and yellow in the fall.
Oh the leaves turn red and yellow,
The leave turn red and yellow
Oh the leaves turn red and yellow in the fall.  Yee-Haw!

Step 2:  Squirt a little red and yellow paint on a paper plate.  Let the children guess what color will result when the two colors are mixed.  Mix the two colors.

Step 3:  Have the children go back to their seats.  Hand out the sheets of construction paper with leaves traced on them.

Step 4:  Have children squirt a little bit of red and orange tempera paint on the leaves.  Let children use their fingers (it’s best to have them use one hand only) to mix the two colors.  Have them cover the whole lear with paint.  Set the pieces of paper aside to dry.

Step 5:  Have the children write this sentence independently on strips of writing paper: “In the fall, leaves change colors.”

Step 6:  When the artwork is dry, have children cut out the traced leaves.  Then have them glue their writing strips to their leaves.

Day four

Step 1:  Read The Tiny Seed  by Eric Carle.  Discuss how flowers bloom and trees blossom in the spring.

Step 2:  Hand out the pieces of 10 x 10-inch white construction paper.  Have children put on paint smocks.

Step 3:  Have each child pick any color watercolor paint to make a medium-sized dot in the middle of their paper, forming the center of a flower.

Step 4:  Have children use another color to paint the outline of the petals.

Step 5:  Have children use another color to paint the inside of the petals.

Step 6:  Have children use another color to paint the stem of the flower.  Set the finished pieces aside to dry.

Step 7:  Have the children write this sentence independently on strips of writing paper:  “In the spring, flowers blossom.”

Step 8:  When the artwork is dry, have children choose a piece of colored construction paper and glue their flower painting to the larger paper.  Add the students’ writing samples underneath the flowers paintings.

Discovering Nature

During Instruction

Set up

  1. Draw a Venn diagram with the words “Fall” and “Spring” on a piece of chart paper.  Set this aside for a discussion.
  2. Set aside four pieces of the construction paper, then cut out one letter of the word “fall” from each piece.  For example, trace a large “F” on one of the pieces of paper and cut it out.  Next, cut out an “A” from another piece of paper, etc.
  3. Repeat the above step for “spring,” using the remaining six pieces of construction paper.
  4. Draw or trace a large leaf on a piece of white construction paper for each child.

Lesson Directions

Day One

Step 1:  Read a picture book about fall aloud.

Step 2:  Discuss the different characteristics of fall.

Step 3:  Have the children cut out pictures from the magazines that correlate with fall.  Have the children place their fall pictures on a paper plate set in the middle of the table.  They will need enough pictures to fill the four pieces of construction paper that spell out “fall.”

Step 4:  After children have accumulated a substantial pile of pictures, have them glue the pictures in collage form to the “fall” construction paper pieces.

Step 5:  Display the collage

Continued…

Discovering Nature

Fall vs. Spring

Scholastic

Preinstructional Planning

Objectives

  • Identify pictures of fall and spring
  • Compare and contrast fall and spring
  • Engage in a color science experiment
  • Identify the different characteristics of a flower
  • Participate in independent writing

Materials

  • Chart paper and markers
  • 10 sheets of 18 x 11-inch construction paper, any color
  • Scissors
  • 18 x 11-inch sheets of white construction paper, one per student
  • Optional:  Leaf stencil
  • At least one picture book about fall (for example, Apples and Pumpkins by Anne Rockwell)
  • At least one picture book about spring (for example, It’s Spring! by Pamela Chanko and Samantha Berger or Spring by Maria Rius)
  • Magazines (You want magazines about food, clothing, animals, and plants.)
  • Paper plates
  • Glue
  • Red and yellow tempera paint
  • The Tiny Seed  by Eric Carle
  • Paint smocks, one per student
  • Strips of writing paper, two per child
  • Pencils
  • 10 x 10-inch pieces of white construction paper, one per child
  • Watercolor paints
  • Paintbrushes
  • Water and cups for painting
  • 18 x 11-inch sheets of colored construction paper, one per child

Continued…